I’m always looking for ways to make eating raw vegetables enjoyable. Ranch is just not an option, and I won’t use anything made out of cream cheese or sour cream. This pretty much eliminates the usual suspects when it comes to dipping veggies. Hummus is my answer to this conundrum. It’s been years since I first heard of hummus. The name is horrible, and to be honest, it doesn’t look all that appetizing either. That’s probably why it took me so long to try it!

Hummus is the Arabic word for chickpeas, which happens to be the main ingredient of hummus.  These days, it can easily be found in just about any grocery store, but you will never want store-bought hummus again after trying this recipe. There is just no comparison. 

 

Hummus
Serves 16
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Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 Cans Chickpeas, drained and rinsed (or 1 lb. Dried Chickpeas, cooked)
  2. 1 Clove of Garlic
  3. 5 T Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
  4. 1/2 tsp Celtic Sea Salt (more if needed)
  5. 1/3 cup Water
  6. 1/3 cup Tahini, stirred well (more if needed)
  7. 1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil (more if needed)
Instructions
  1. Place the chickpeas, garlic, and kosher salt in the bowl of a food processor. Process for about 30 seconds. Stop and scrape down the sides of the bowl, then process for another 15 to 20 seconds. Add the lemon juice and water. Process for 20 seconds. Add the tahini. Process for 20 seconds, then scrape down the sides of the bowl. With the processor running, drizzle in the olive oil. Add more salt if needed, and I may add a touch more water to reach the consistency I like.
Notes
  1. Play around with the amount of tahini and oil. I tend to like a bit more tahini in my hummus. :)
Live Fit. Love Food. http://livefitlovefood.com/
Serving Size 2 oz. | Calories 120g | Carbs 6g | Protein 3g | Fat 10g | Fiber 2g
Also known as Garbanzo beans, chickpeas are high in protein, and don’t contain any cholesterol or saturated fats,
Tahini is a paste that is made of ground sesame seeds. Like chickpeas, It is also high in protein and used frequently in Middle Eastern cuisine. Look for it in the international food isles of your grocery store.

Hummus

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